To Be or Not To Be Sugar-Free: The Facts About Common Sweeteners

Sweeteners (3)Originally created for people that can’t consume regular sugars, alternative and artificial sweeteners have become extremely popular in Incline Village in all kinds of different products. From chewing gum to diet soda, Dr. Matthew Milligan wants you to know which of these options are best for your dental and general health, so here are the facts about a few of the most common sweeteners. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Incline Dental Care.

The Big Five Sugar Substitutes

The benefits of natural and artificial sugar-free sweeteners were first recognized as a safe option for diabetics, but have since exploded in popularity because food, beverage, candy, and snack companies have discovered that it is easier to sell fewer calories. In addition, Incline Village residents with a sweet tooth know that artificial sweeteners are notorious for their ability to ruin your portion control. All of the following substances are considered sugar-free and inhibit tooth decay because bacteria cannot ferment them into enamel-destroying acids. Despite ongoing controversy about health concerns of sugar substitutes, the FDA considers all of the following substances to be safe for regular consumption.

  1. Aspartame is a non-caloric (calorie free) artificial sweetener roughly 200 times sweeter than table sugar and is common in sodas, candy, and gum. It is the main ingredient in NutraSweet, Equal, and Sugar Twin brand sweetener packets. Although the FDA considers it to be safe, health advocates claim that it causes headaches and general malaise. University of Liverpool researchers have also found that when combined with a common food coloring agent, aspartame can become toxic to brain cells. It is also linked to weight gain and appetite control problems.
  2. Saccharin is the sugar-free stuff in the tiny pink Sweet’n’Low packets Incline Village residents have been seeing for years. This substance is the oldest artificial sweetener and is 200-700 times sweeter than sugar. It is non-caloric and can be found in a ton of different products. Although saccharin doesn’t have quite as bad a reputation as aspartame, the American Cancer Society found in one study that saccharin is linked to weight gain.
  3. Sucralose (Splenda) is an artificial, non-caloric sweetener derived from sucrose (table sugar) in a patented process that replaces several hydroxyl molecules with chlorine atoms. Health concerns with sucralose are mainly related to the body’s inability to detoxify certain substances, specifically organochlorine compounds like sucralose. Health advocates claim that not enough long-term studies have been performed to determine its safety, but the FDA has approved it. Environmentalists worry that sucralose may subtly affect the ecosystem, because it is commonly found downstream of waste treatment plants.
  4. Stevia (Truvia) is classified as a novel sweetener and is derived from the leaves of the stevia plant. Although it is new to western society, it has been used for hundreds of years by the Guarani Indians of Paraguay. It is non-caloric and poses no known health risks, although it is still undergoing testing by various international food safety agencies, the FDA has awarded it GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status. The largest complaint against stevia is its distinctive aftertaste. Stevia is up to 300 times sweeter than standard sugar, and as with all calorie-free sugar substitutes, it may cause weight gain because it does not provide the ‘full’ feeling we are used to from sugar.
  5. Xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar alcohol, or polyol, that is derived from vegetable fibers such as corn husks or tree bark. Sugar alcohols are common components in candy, gum, and chocolate and do not actually contain any alcohol. Xylitol is the only sweetener that has been proven to provide active resistance to dental caries. Consuming between three and ten grams of xylitol (in chewing gum, lozenges, etc.) per day is an effective method of fighting tooth decay. However, Dr. Matthew Milligan wants every Incline Village resident to know that most gums at your local supermarket checkout counter do not contain enough xylitol to have any effect. They are available in pharmacies, specialty stores, and online. Look for gums that list xylitol as the first or second ingredient. Also, be aware that xylitol gums, while very healthy for your teeth, can be deadly to dogs.

If you would like to discuss the healthiest way to sweeten your coffee or want to visit Incline Dental Care for a consultation, and don’t forget to give us a call with any questions or concerns!

Sources

http://www.umass.edu/nibble/infofile/artsweet.html

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/04/saccharin-aspartame-dangers.aspx

http://www.sugar.org/other-sweeteners/artificial-sweeteners/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3038976

http://www.rodalenews.com/sweeteners

http://www.downtoearth.org/health/vitamins-supplements/sucralose-dangerous-sugar-substitute

Dr. Milligan was born and raised in Reno, NV, and graduated from Sparks High School in 1996. He went on to graduate from the University of Nevada Reno in 2003 “with distinction” with a bachelor’s of science in biology, and from the University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine cum lade in 2009 with his DMD. Following graduation, Dr. Milligan worked as a dentist in Carbondale, IL for 3 years and in Las Vegas, NV for 1.5 years before purchasing Incline Dental Care from Dr. Duncan in December 2013.

Posted in Dental Health, Dental News, Patient Care